Leading the Way

January 11, 2011

 

Mercy’s Laura Yelton, RN,
a nurse in the recovery room,
enters information into a patient’s
electronic health record after their surgery. 

By Mercy's Laura Keep

Long before there were any government incentives for electronic health records (EHR), Mercy invested more than $450 million to provide its patients across Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma this valuable service. Today, Mercy’s continuously updated electronic health record system serves more than 2 million patients across multiple sites of care, including hospitals and physician offices. It’s a level of connectivity found in less than 4 percent of hospitals nationwide.

“Knowing whether someone is diabetic or highly allergic to penicillin is critical to safety. That’s why more than five years ago we knew it was vital for us to implement an EHR, allowing us to share information between all our health care providers,” said Glenn Mitchell, M.D., Mercy chief medical officer. “While now there are government expectations in place, for Mercy it’s always been about doing the right thing for clinical care.”

The federal government’s 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is now providing incentives for health care providers to not only have an EHR system but demonstrate that it has “meaningful use” to those needing health care. Beginning in April 2011, hospitals and providers will have a chance to verify whether or not their EHR meets Stage 1 of the meaningful use standards. Ten Mercy hospitals will be among the first in the nation to provide this meaningful use verification. They are targeted to provide their attestation to the government for their 90 consecutive day validation period from April 1 through June 30. More

Meaningful Use Photos for Media Use

01 – A mockup of Mercy’s electronic health record up close.
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02 – Mercy’s Dr. Shu-Ming Wang updates a patient’s electronic health record in real-time.
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03 – Lauren Barnes, a Mercy patient, demonstrates meaningful by using her iPhone to schedule doctor appointments, renew prescriptions, view lab results and contact her doctor via MyMercy – a free online service.
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04 – MyMercy, a free online service, is just one example of how easy access to electronic health records can be meaningful to patients. MyMercy gives patients the ability to track their health history, schedule appointments, contact their doctor with a question and renew prescriptions all via a smart phone or personal computer.
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05 – Taresa Copeland, a Mercy patient and piano teacher, regularly uses her computer to access MyMercy – a free online service that allows her to manage her medical care. MyMercy is just one way in which Mercy has made electronic health records meaningful to patients.
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06 – MyMercy, a free online service, is just one example of how easy access to electronic health records can be meaningful to patients. MyMercy gives patients the ability to track their health history, schedule appointments, contact their doctor with a question and renew prescriptions all via a smart phone or personal computer.
Download Hi-Res Image

07 – Brendon McCollom, a Mercy physician, can use MyMercy to send secure messages to patients 24/7 via a computer or smart phone.
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08 – Mercy’s Laura Yelton, RN, a nurse in the recovery room, enters information into a patient’s electronic health record after their surgery.
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