Rural Patients Access Care from Home

February 9, 2011

 

April Revis, a nurse practitioner in
Waldron, Ark., checks a patient’s blood
pressure.

Thanks to a $495,926 USDA telemedicine grant, Mercy will be able to provide 900 people in some of the nation’s most hard-to-reach rural areas medical care like they’ve never known before.

Through the three-year tele-home project, Mercy – a network of hospitals and physician offices in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma – will target patients with the most chronic ailments, including diabetes, heart disease and respiratory disease. The grant monies will fund monitoring devices so patients can electronically transmit results from home via computer or telephone line directly to their physician. More

Supplemental Materials

Telemedicine Photos for Media Use

01 – April Revis, a nurse practitioner in Waldron, Ark., checks Sandra Staggs’ blood pressure. Patients with chronic diseases like high blood pressure will be able to monitor it at home and transmit their results to their physician.
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02 – April Revis, a nurse practitioner in Waldron, Ark., checks a patient’s blood pressure.
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03 – April Revis, a nurse practitioner in Waldron, Ark., checks a patient’s blood pressure.
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04 – 71 South in northwest Arkansas is just one example of how difficult travel can be for rural residents on roads over sometimes mountainous areas.
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05 – Mercy’s Scott County Rural Health Clinic, located in Waldron, Ark., 45 miles from the closest urban area, is one of the six Mercy facilities participating in the $495,926 USDA telemedicine grant project.
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