Outpatient Rehab in Hot Springs Village

October 13, 2011

Sarah Hurst

St. Joseph’s Mercy continues to expand its services with the addition of outpatient rehabilitation at Mercy Clinic in Hot Springs Village.

St. Joseph’s Mercy Outpatient Rehabilitation offers specialized treatment to meet the needs of each individual patient, specializing in a variety of areas including orthopedics, geriatrics, hand therapy, women’s health, sports injuries and sports performance.

Sarah Hurst will see patients in Hot Springs Village as the staff physical therapist.

“We are going to see all kinds of patients from total knee replacements to rotator cuff to chronic pain and regular joint pain,” said Annie Massanelli, director of physical therapy for St. Joseph’s Mercy. “Sarah is also really good with vestibular balance disorders. We’re really going to run the gambit from diagnosis. And we’re also going to target the full age range from pediatric orthopedic issues all the way up to our geriatric patients that make up the main population of this area.”

The addition of outpatient rehab services follows the addition of several new services in Hot Springs Village this year. Earlier in the year, the Mercy Imaging Center opened, offering mammography services, CT and MRI for the first time in the Village.

“The services we’ve added this year have been those requested by Village residents and we’re happy to be able to provide them a little closer to home,” said Tim Johnsen, President of St. Joseph’s Mercy Health System.

Hurst is a Hot Springs native, having attended Lake Hamilton High School and now holds a doctorate in physical therapy from Andrews University in Michigan.

“I’m very excited to bring physical therapy to the Village and to be a part of Mercy,” Hurst said. “We’re participating in some exciting, cutting edge therapy that has not been offered here. We’re focusing on prevention of falls and vestibular balance rehab and just general strengthening.”

Mercy Outpatient Rehabilitation Hot Springs Village is located on the same side as the Mercy Imaging Center on the top level of the building.

“We just want to improve the care out here in the Village and we’re exciting about adding these services,” Hurst said.

Later this year, Hurst also expects to be able to offer dry needling, also known as intramuscular stimulation, which is the use of solid filiform needles for therapy of muscle pain.

“It is for patients with chronic pain and traumatic sports injuries,” Hurst said. “It’s an acupuncture-type therapy that involves needling muscles that have potentially had injury. It’s an exciting, integrated form of therapy.”

St. Joseph’s Mercy is a not-for-profit, faith-based health facility with 27 medical clinics serving the healthcare needs of Hot Springs and its surrounding communities since 1888 as the region’s most preferred provider of health care services including cardiac, cancer and women’s.

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